Wexit: 11% drop in value of Eating at Warwick points after university votes to leave Russell Group

Vice chancellor announces resignation following university's vote to leave Russell Group

Wexit: 11% drop in value of Eating at Warwick points after university votes to leave Russell Group

Warwick’s vice chancellor has announced he is to step down following the results of yesterday’s referendum on the university’s membership of the Russell Group.

Speaking outside the Rootes Building, he said “fresh leadership” was needed after a slim majority of students voted in favour of a Wexit.

The referendum was called due to a growing feeling of discontent within the student community over immigration. One postgraduate Lakeside resident was quoted as saying, “over 1000 people immigrate every day from Leamington Spa and we simply don’t have space, it’s putting increased strain on campus services like the library and Costcutter. It’s time to take our university back.”

Despite warnings from the economics department over the damage to the university’s economy this outcome might bring and concerns from the science departments over Russell Group funding, the cardboard signs put up all over the library bridge and the campaign leaflets threatening that the University of Lincoln might be set to join the Russell Group appear to have swayed many undecided voters.

Warwick markets have been in turmoil following the result, with an 11% drop in the value of Eating at Warwick points.

Many younger students are disappointed at the result because SU polls show that final year students were among the most likely to be Russell-skeptic, when in fact it is the first year students who will have to live with the consequences of the decision.

Votes across the campus residences were not evenly split, however, with Cryfield and Whitefields turning out to be the most in favour of a Wexit. On the other hand, Rootes voted to stay in and there was a very strong Remain vote coming from Westwood, prompting fears that it may hold a second referendum on independence next year in order to stay in the Russell Group.

Additionally, tensions are rising in the isolated island population of Heronbank which voted 96% in favour of remaining, amid fears that Coventry may take its opportunity to invade and reclaim what was once considered a part of the city.